Clinical Trials

We are committed to bringing patients worldwide better treatment options.

We are recruiting for clinical trials across a wide range of therapeutic indications, including lymphoma, liver cancers, lung cancers, gastric cancers, breast cancers, and more.

Questions about a clinical trial?

If you are a patient or a health care provider and would like more information about a clinical trial, please contact our research team.

Search Clinical Trials

  • Age
  • Available Documents
  • Patient Level Data Anonymized patient level data for select studies available to qualified scientific researchers
  • Phases <strong>Phase 1:</strong> A step in clinical research to focus on the safety of a drug and how it works in the body.<br />

<strong>Phase 2:</strong> A step in clinical research to gather data on whether a drug works in people who have a certain condition or disease.<br />

<strong>Phase 3:</strong> A step in clinical research that gathers more information about a drug’s safety and if it works in people.<br />

<strong>Phase 4:</strong> A step in clinical research after regulatory authorities have approved a drug for marketing.<br />

<strong>N/A:</strong> For observational studies or interventional studies that do not support drug development.
  • Results
  • Sex In this context, a person’s sex refers to that person’s assigned sex at birth. This has been the case historically; however, there is growing understanding in the healthcare community that this definition excludes certain segments of the population and should be expanded, where possible, to account for gender identity as well. BeiGene recognizes the importance of making clinical trials accessible to all groups of people and is committed to promoting inclusive research.
  • Study Status <strong>Recruiting:</strong> The study is open to enrollment for qualified participants.<br />

<strong>Will be Recruiting:</strong> The study has not yet opened enrollment for qualified participants.<br />

<strong>Recruitment Complete:</strong> The study is ongoing, and participants are receiving an intervention or being examined, but new potential participants are not currently being recruited or enrolled.<br />

<strong>Completed:</strong> The study has ended normally, and participants are no longer receiving an intervention or being examined.<br />

<strong>Other:</strong> All other study statuses such as withdrawn, canceled, or terminated.<br />
  • Study Type <strong>Expanded Access:</strong> A way for patients with serious diseases or conditions who cannot participate in a clinical study to gain access to a medical product that has not been approved by regulatory authorities. Also called compassionate use.<br />

<strong>Interventional:</strong> A type of clinical trial in which participants are assigned to groups that receive one or more treatment or study drug (intervention).<br />

<strong>Observational:</strong> A type of clinical study in which participants may receive diagnostic or study drugs but the study investigator does not assign participants to a a specific intervention or treatment.
  • Vaccine Studies
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Search Results

Study ID
Phase
Condition(s)
Status
Sex
Age Range

BGB-23339-101

1

Not Determined

Recruiting

All

18 Years to 55 Years (Adult)

Learn More

BGB-23339-101

Recruiting

Phase

1

Condition

Not Determined

Sex

All

Age

18 Years to 55 Years (Adult)


BGB-A317-212

2

Advanced Solid Tumor

Recruiting

All

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)

Learn More

BGB-A317-212

Recruiting

Phase

2

Condition

Advanced Solid Tumor

Sex

All

Age

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)


AdvanTIG-205

2

Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Recruiting

All

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)

Learn More

AdvanTIG-205

Recruiting

Phase

2

Condition

Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

Sex

All

Age

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)


BGB-16673-101

1

B-cell Malignancy | Marginal Zone Lymphoma | Follicular Lymphoma | Non-hodgkin Lymphoma | Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

Recruiting

All

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)

Learn More

BGB-16673-101

Recruiting

Phase

1

Condition

B-cell Malignancy | Marginal Zone Lymphoma | Follicular Lymphoma | Non-hodgkin Lymphoma | Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

Sex

All

Age

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)


BGB-A317-213

2

Resectable Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Recruiting

All

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)

Learn More

BGB-A317-213

Recruiting

Phase

2

Condition

Resectable Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Sex

All

Age

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)


BGB-11417-105

1

Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Recruiting

All

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)

Learn More

BGB-11417-105

Recruiting

Phase

1

Condition

Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Sex

All

Age

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)


AdvanTIG-204

2

Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

Recruiting

All

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)

Learn More

AdvanTIG-204

Recruiting

Phase

2

Condition

Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

Sex

All

Age

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)


AdvanTIG-206

2

Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Recruiting

All

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)

Learn More

AdvanTIG-206

Recruiting

Phase

2

Condition

Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Sex

All

Age

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)


BGB-A317-Sitravatinib 301

3

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Recruiting

All

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)

Learn More

BGB-A317-Sitravatinib 301

Recruiting

Phase

3

Condition

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Sex

All

Age

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)


BGB-11417-102

1

Mature B-cell Malignancies

Recruiting

All

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)

Learn More

BGB-11417-102

Recruiting

Phase

1

Condition

Mature B-cell Malignancies

Sex

All

Age

18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult)


Questions about Clinical Trials?

You can find information and participation on clinical trials below

What Are Clinical Trials?

A clinical trial is a type of research study designed to learn if a research medicine works and is safe for people. A government regulator, such as the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration), the NMPA (China National Medical Products Administration), an others must approve clinical trials before they can start. The data collected from clinical trials are then reviewed by government regulators to see if they help people and are safe before they approve a new medicine for use by the general public.

woman_looking_through_microscope

There Should Be No New Medicines Without Clinical Trials

Clinical trials help researchers find better treatments for people. Before a drug is made available to the general public, it must go through several phases of clinical research and regulatory approvals that show it is safe and works. Most medicines available today are the result of past clinical research driven by patients’ unmet needs and lack of available treatment options. Without clinical trials, there would be no new medications. Clinical trial volunteers play a big role in this process.

woman_reading_to_child

Why Diversity Matters In Clinical Trials?

Diversity in clinical trials leads to better research, treatments, and health outcomes for all people because drugs can work another way in different people. A person’s age, gender, ethnicity, and genetics contributes data that drives real-world results outcomes, and leads to better research and treatments for all people.

doctors_and_nurse_discussing

Why Do People Take Part In Clinical Trials?

People take part in clinical trials for many reasons, including potential access to research study drugs or treatments, and helping others by contributing data that is used to expand knowledge about a disease or possible treatment option. It is important to note that participating in a clinical trial may or may not help the person who is taking part in the study.

Your Rights In A Clinical Trial

You have the choice to be in a clinical trial and are given enough time to make that decision without pressure from the study team. Even after joining the study, you have the right to withdraw at any time and for any reason without any effect on your routine medical care.
You also have the right to be told why the clinical trial is being done, what will be required of you, and what the known risks, discomforts, or side effects that may occur during the study. You will be informed of the steps the study team will take to protect your personal health information, and to ensure that personal data collected during the clinical trial will be used only for the purposes explained to you prior to agreeing to take part in the clinical trial.

Clinical Trial Phases

Clinical trials are done in several steps called “phases.” Each clinical phase has a different purpose and helps study researchers answer questions about the drug being tested, such as what is the best dose of the drug to use, and how well does it work?

Pre-Clinical Trials

Before clinical trials can be done with people, researchers study drugs and treatments in the lab. This is called “pre-clinical development.” This research is extremely important in getting information on a drug’s possible benefits and risks before it is tested in people.

Phase I

Phase 1 clinical trials evaluate the safety and possible side effects of a drug being studied in a small group of people.

Phase II

Phase 2 clinical trials further learn about side effects people have while using the study drug and help to determine which dose of the drug works best. Phase 2 clinical trials are usually conducted with a larger group of people than Phase 1 clinical trials.

Phase III

Phase 3 trials confirm that the study drug or treatment helps people who have the disease or condition the study drug or treatment was made for. Phase 3 clinical trials are conducted in an even larger group of people than Phase 2 clinical trials.

Phase IV

Phase 4 trials are done after a study drug or treatment has been approved for all people to use. They are done to learn how a study drug or treatment works when people are taking it as part of their everyday lives. Sometimes these trials are “observational” studies, where people in observational studies are prescribed the drug in the usual manner. They are not assigned to a treatment by the study researchers.

Joining A Clinical Trial

If you are thinking about joining a clinical trial, a team of professionals will assess if you are a good fit for a specific study. Taking part in a clinical trial is different from regular medical care. You will be in contact with the study team that includes the study doctor, nurses, and research coordinators. People of all ages, genders, races, and ethnic groups can participate in clinical trials. This includes healthy volunteers and patients with specific diagnoses. See below to learn more about the process of joining a clinical trial and what to expect.

Pre-Screening

You will answer questions about your health and medical history and make an appointment to learn more. The team will review with you the instructions for taking part in the trial.

Informed Consent

At your appointment, the study team provides you information to review about the details of the clinical trial, including possible risks and benefits, so you know what to expect. If you decide to participate in the clinical trial, you will sign an “Informed Consent” document giving permission for additional screenings and access to your health records.

Screening Visit

This visit will confirm that you meet the clinical trial requirements. It includes a more detailed review of your medical history and a physical exam. It may also include additional tests related to your condition.

Study Participation

The study team will tell you what will happen, how the process works, and will answer any questions you have. They will be clear about how much of your time is required during study participation. The study team will also check in with you regularly to ask questions and see how you are doing.

Follow Up

The study team may call you or require additional visits after the clinical trial ends to check on your health and write down any changes that may have happened. The study team will tell you before you join the study if you will need to do any follow-up.